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Blogs

Sometimes there's writers' block and other times there's, well, something more akin to diarrhoea of the verbiage persuasion.

This rambling rant is the latter. My mind was having a free-thought day, my fingers were on the keyboard, here it is in its unadulterated, unpolished, form.

There are big questions and observations that might or might not be connected but most of all there's this - our current situation has raised many issues that have arisen through complacency, ignorance or, even, attempts to adopt the "someone else's problem" approach to management. Chickens, meet roost.

Nigel Morris-Cotterill

The title is a pun. Well, probably not a pun, actually. It's taking a statement that isn't ironic nor sarcastic, an expression that's more term of art than literal, and - because it's English and we can do this kind of thing - twisting it into something with a single-use, throwaway, purpose.

The original expression refers to "that old fashioned look," which means half-way between flirtation and "come-hither." It's not quite an open invitation to a shag but it's travelling in that general direction. Strangely, I haven't had to twist it much.

Nigel Morris-Cotterill

In 1996, in How not to be a money launderer, I wrote the following:

"Bank Leu is a legitimate Swiss bank with an office in Luxembourg. In 1993, it was convicted in a district court in California of laundering drugs money originating in Columbia. Bank Leu had no branches nor even representative offices in the USA, in fact it had no presence there at all."

In 2003, another author, with the backing of a large publisher, wrote

"Bank Leu is a legitimate bank in Europe: it has no representation in the United States of any kind, or at least did not in 1993. ... that in that year it was convicted...

Nigel Morris-Cotterill

It's been going on for weeks, the deluge of spam about personal protective equipment of one sort of another. But this one is special.

Nigel Morris-Cotterill

A recent spate of cases in the USA has, after the best part of a decade, concluded that crypto-assets are to be regarded as property.

Seriously: this is one of the simplest things to work out and courts - and legislatures - have been making a meal out of something that is blindingly obvious.

Yet, bizarrely, it's not only US courts that are finding this difficult.

Nigel Morris-Cotterill

As lockdowns continue - and are eased - there is an obvious but forgotten crisis that has already begun but is going to get far, far, worse. And this time it's a human not an economic or medical crisis.

Nigel Morris-Cotterill

We've added around 1,000 subscribers since the last newsletter so, to you,
thank you and to those who've been on the list for, in some cases, getting
on for 20 years, thanks for your patience over the past few months while
other things have taken priority.

Nigel Morris-Cotterill

In one of the worst kept secrets of recent times, the case of Rihan v EY Global and others has reached its first major milestone - a formal hearing before the English High Court. It's all about money laundering, skulduggery and all that sexy stuff. But that's just froth. The real meat of the Order comes in the far less seductive part of the case - the choice of venue and corporate responsibility for downstream malfeasance.

Nigel Morris-Cotterill

What more can I say than here is proof : artificial intelligence is not ready for prime time in the financial sector.

Nigel Morris-Cotterill

There are many things that make me shake my head and wonder how come the world is full of "experts" on things that are common sense.

Is there no common sense any longer? Are we moribund unless someone tells us what to do and, even, how to do it.

And does that stasis even extend to thinking?

Apparently, we now need to be taught about "critical thinking."

Nigel Morris-Cotterill

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