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20151008 Further evidence that belief is not fact..

Nigel Morris-Cotterill

A report in The Guardian says that the leader of the "eBible Fellowship" has announced that the world will end on 7th October.

Given that his group is headquartered near Philadelphia, there are still a couple of hours for his prediction to come true. But for most of us, he's already wrong. Sitting in Kuala Lumpur, while the continued pollution blowing from Indonesia has left Malaysia and Singapore with air that looks like Hollywood's worst visions of a post-apocalyptic world, it's not the end of the world.

It's not the first time that Chris McCann has predicted the end of the world. He was proved wrong when we kept on plugging on after 21 May 2011. He claims to be a biblical scholar who has interpreted the Bible and that, on 7 October, the world will be "gone forever. Annihilated... by fire."

He's not the only Christian crackpot making such predictions. Others have said that the "blood moon" lunar eclipse of 27 September heralded destruction within seven years.

Read the full article at http://www.theguardian.com/world/2015/oct/06/end-of-world-7-october-ebib... to get the full scale of how Christian religious "experts" are doing the same as all religious nutters do everywhere - using the name of religion to make their own case for change. And claiming to be biblical, etc., scholars to justify their lunatic claims.

From our point of view, however, this story demonstrates one of the truths set out in my book "Understanding Suspicion in Financial Crime:" belief in something does not make it a fact.

Understanding Suspicion in Financial Crime: Seminars and paperback: see the "Books" section of this website.

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